Near death, explained

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Near death, explained

Post  guest... on Tue Apr 24, 2012 7:14 pm

New science is shedding light on what really happens during out-of-body experiences -- with shocking results.

In 1991, Atlanta-based singer and songwriter Pam Reynolds felt extremely dizzy, lost her ability to speak, and had difficulty moving her body. A CAT scan showed that she had a giant artery aneurysm—a grossly swollen blood vessel in the wall of her basilar artery, close to the brain stem. If it burst, which could happen at any moment, it would kill her. But the standard surgery to drain and repair it might kill her too.

With no other options, Pam turned to a last, desperate measure offered by neurosurgeon Robert Spetzler at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. Dr. Spetzler was a specialist and pioneer in hypothermic cardiac arrest—a daring surgical procedure nicknamed “Operation Standstill.” Spetzler would bring Pam’s body down to a temperature so low that she was essentially dead. Her brain would not function, but it would be able to survive longer without oxygen at this temperature. The low temperature would also soften the swollen blood vessels, allowing them to be operated on with less risk of bursting. When the procedure was complete, the surgical team would bring her back to a normal temperature before irreversible damage set in.

Essentially, Pam agreed to die in order to save her life—and in the process had what is perhaps the most famous case of independent corroboration of out of body experience (OBE) perceptions on record. This case is especially important because cardiologist Michael Sabom was able to obtain verification from medical personnel regarding crucial details of the surgical intervention that Pam reported. Here’s what happened.

Pam was brought into the operating room at 7:15 a.m., she was given general anesthesia, and she quickly lost conscious awareness. At this point, Spetzler and his team of more than 20 physicians, nurses, and technicians went to work. They lubricated Pam’s eyes to prevent drying, and taped them shut. They attached EEG electrodes to monitor the electrical activity of her cerebral cortex. They inserted small, molded speakers into her ears and secured them with gauze and tape. The speakers would emit repeated 100-decibel clicks—approximately the noise produced by a speeding express train—eliminating outside sounds and measuring the activity of her brainstem.

At 8:40 a.m., the tray of surgical instruments was uncovered, and Robert Spetzler began cutting through Pam’s skull with a special surgical saw that produced a noise similar to a dental drill. At this moment, Pam later said, she felt herself “pop” out of her body and hover above it, watching as doctors worked on her body.

Although she no longer had use of her eyes and ears, she described her observations in terms of her senses and perceptions. “I thought the way they had my head shaved was very peculiar,” she said. “I expected them to take all of the hair, but they did not.” She also described the Midas Rex bone saw (“The saw thing that I hated the sound of looked like an electric toothbrush and it had a dent in it … ”) and the dental-drill sound it made with considerable accuracy.

Meanwhile, Spetzler was removing the outermost membrane of Pamela’s brain, cutting it open with scissors. At about the same time, a female cardiac surgeon was attempting to locate the femoral artery in Pam’s right groin. Remarkably, Pam later claimed to remember a female voice saying, “We have a problem. Her arteries are too small.” And then a male voice: “Try the other side.” Medical records confirm this conversation, yet Pam could not have heard them.

The cardiac surgeon was right—Pam’s blood vessels were indeed too small to accept the abundant blood flow requested by the cardiopulmonary bypass machine, so at 10:50 a.m., a tube was inserted into Pam’s left femoral artery and connected to the cardiopulmonary bypass machine. The warm blood circulated from the artery into the cylinders of the bypass machine, where it was cooled down before being returned to her body. Her body temperature began to fall, and at 11:05 a.m. Pam’s heart stopped. Her EEG brain waves flattened into total silence. A few minutes later, her brain stem became totally unresponsive, and her body temperature fell to a sepulchral 60 degrees Fahrenheit. At 11:25 a.m., the team tilted up the head of the operating table, turned off the bypass machine, and drained the blood from her body. Pamela Reynolds was clinically dead.

At this point, Pam’s out-of-body adventure transformed into a near-death experience (NDE): She recalls floating out of the operating room and traveling down a tunnel with a light. She saw deceased relatives and friends, including her long-dead grandmother, waiting at the end of this tunnel. She entered the presence of a brilliant, wonderfully warm and loving light, and sensed that her soul was part of God and that everything in existence was created from the light (the breathing of God). But this extraordinary experience ended abruptly, as Reynolds’s deceased uncle led her back to her body—a feeling she described as “plunging into a pool of ice.”

Meanwhile, in the operating room, the surgery had come to an end. When all the blood had drained from Pam’s brain, the aneurysm simply collapsed and Spetzler clipped it off. Soon, the bypass machine was turned on and warm blood was pumped back into her body. As her body temperature started to increase, her brainsteam began to respond to the clicking speakers in her ears and the EEG recorded electrical activity in the cortex. The bypass machine was turned off at 12:32 p.m. Pam’s life had been restored, and she was taken to the recovery room in stable condition at 2:10 p.m.

Tales of otherworldly experiences have been part of human cultures seemingly forever, but NDEs as such first came to broad public attention in 1975 by way of American psychiatrist and philosopher Raymond Moody’s popular book Life After Life. He presented more than 100 case studies of people who experienced vivid mental experiences close to death or during “clinical death” and were subsequently revived to tell the tale. Their experiences were remarkably similar, and Moody coined the term NDE to refer to this phenomenon. The book was popular and controversial, and scientific investigation of NDEs began soon after its publication with the founding, in 1978, of the International Association for Near Death Studies (IANDS)—the first organization in the world devoted to the scientific study of NDEs and their relationship to mind and consciousness.

http://www.salon.com/2012/04/21/near_death_explained/singleton/

Lots more to read, as much as I am skeptical, this was quite interesting providing both sides, still not convinced mind and doubt anyone will know until we kick the bucket.
As I say though found very interesting!

The article is by:

Excerpted with permission from “The Brain Wars: The Scientific Battle Over the Existence of the Mind and the Proof That Will Change the Way We Live Our Lives.” Courtesy of HarperOne.

Mario Beauregard is associate research professor at the Departments of Psychology and Radiology and the Neuroscience Research Center at the University of Montreal. He is the coauthor of "The Spiritual Brain" and more than one hundred publications in neuroscience, psychology and psychiatry.

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Re: Near death, explained

Post  bill stickers on Tue Apr 24, 2012 9:53 pm

wow

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Re: Near death, explained

Post  Hugh Jardon on Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:28 pm

bill stickers wrote:wow



it's pure bollocks.
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Re: Near death, explained

Post  bill stickers on Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:35 pm

Hugh Jardon wrote:


it's pure bollocks.

is it tho

loads of ppl have said the same thing

some of them arent nutters 2

i think there is something after we die

what it is tho

no one will know till we get there

i doubt it will be some bearded bloke with a list of all the shit i done

f**king hope not anyway

or 700 virgins

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Re: Near death, explained

Post  Hugh Jardon on Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:39 pm

bill stickers wrote:

is it tho

loads of ppl have said the same thing

some of them arent nutters 2

i think there is something after we die

what it is tho

no one will know till we get there

i doubt it will be some bearded bloke with a list of all the shit i done

f**king hope not anyway

or 700 virgins



I don't doubt that people see these things...but they are no more 'real' than a dream.
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Re: Near death, explained

Post  bill stickers on Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:04 pm

Hugh Jardon wrote:


I don't doubt that people see these things...but they are no more 'real' than a dream.

so then how come ppl who describe this stuff can even say who came in and out of the room

even tho they have had their eyes sealed are knocked out and dead

all the way to describing processes and stuff they couldnt have seen unless they had their eyes open and had been there
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Re: Near death, explained

Post  Hugh Jardon on Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:14 pm

bill stickers wrote:

so then how come ppl who describe this stuff can even say who came in and out of the room

even tho they have had their eyes sealed are knocked out and dead

all the way to describing processes and stuff they couldnt have seen unless they had their eyes open and had been there


for the very same reason that people 'remember' things that have never happend.
Pls don't forget that even when under the deepest of sleeps, you are still 'aware'.
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Re: Near death, explained

Post  bill stickers on Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:25 pm

Hugh Jardon wrote:


for the very same reason that people 'remember' things that have never happend.
Pls don't forget that even when under the deepest of sleeps, you are still 'aware'.


hmmm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._J._Ayer

affraid
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Re: Near death, explained

Post  Hugh Jardon on Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:41 pm

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